Dog Confinement Agreement

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Dic 07

Dog Confinement Agreement

However, Section 71.51(c) (2) states that “the Director of the [CDC] may authorize the admission of dogs that have not been sufficiently vaccinated against rabies, provided that the dogs are locked up in conditions limiting their contact with humans and other animals until they have been vaccinated. In general, the use of the term “must” in a regulation indicates a regulatory requirement, while the use of the term “may” indicates that the Agency has room for discretion in how it decides to apply this specific aspect of its regulations. In this notice, and as explained in more detail below, HHS/CDC informs the public of how it applies its discretion in the establishment and implementation of birthing agreements. With the considerable increase in the number of containment agreements required by dog importers in recent years, monitoring detention agreements to identify and combat offences, as described above, has become administratively cumbersome. Investigations have shown that, in many cases, when importers have breached their containment agreements, these containment agreements have been issued to persons who import dogs for commercial or non-pet purposes, contrary to the intent of the birthing agreement. If an importer is denied the opportunity to obtain a detention agreement, the refusal is issued in writing. The rejection letter received contains reasons for refusal and detailed instructions on who you can respond to, including name, address and telephone number, as well as how to file a complaint. Those wishing to challenge HHS/CDC`s decision have five working days from the time the rejection letter is received. The importer must submit the complaint in writing to the Director of the CDC, specifying the reasons for the complaint and specifying that there is a real and substantial issue. HHS/CDC will provide a written response that will begin the printed page 39406 as the agency`s final action.

The complaint will be reviewed and decided by an HHS/CDC management officer who will direct the employee who issued the initial rejection letter. Among other things, there are circumstances that HHS/CDC will consider when deciding whether to establish an agreement on the detention of dogs: (3) the history of non-compliance with the HHS/CDC agreements; When public and local public health authorities follow notifications of the containment agreement and find that the importer is violating the agreement, they notify HHS/CDC. In 2009, HHS/CDC began sending warning letters to known violations of dog detention agreements. The warning letters inform importers that they have violated the legally binding birthing agreement, recall their obligations under federal law and warn them that other offences could lead to the U.S. attorney`s office being referred to the court. In fiscal 2013, more than 20 dog importers, including those importing more than 1 to 2 deliveries of dogs per year to the United States, received letters of formal notice from HHS/CDC for non-compliance with the containment agreement. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) publishes these emission and enforcement guidelines for dog detention agreements at 42 CFR 71.51.